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SATURDAY MARCH 21, 2015

The Penn State Symposium for Teaching and Learning with Technology is both an annual event and a year-round online discussion of ways that faculty and staff are using technology to enhance teaching, learning, and research.


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Saturday, March 21
 

7:30am

Breakfast and Registration
Saturday March 21, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
President's Hall

8:30am

Opening Remarks
Saturday March 21, 2015 8:30am - 8:45am
President's Hall

8:45am

Keynote: "Educating the Innovators of the 21st Century" by Dr. Eric Mazur
Can we teach innovation? Innovation requires whole-brain thinking — right-brain thinking for creativity and imagination, and left-brain thinking for planning and execution. Our current approach to education in science and technology, focuses on the transfer of information, developing mostly right-brain thinking by stressing copying and reproducing existing ideas rather than generating new ones. I will show how shifting the focus in lectures from delivering information to team work and creative thinking greatly improves the learning that takes place in the classroom and promotes independent thinking.

Saturday March 21, 2015 8:45am - 9:45am
President's Hall

9:45am

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 21, 2015 9:45am - 10:00am
TBA

9:45am

COIL Links e-Poster Sessions 1
The e-poster presentations in the COIL Links area will feature COIL-funded researchers describing the progress they are making and the questions they’re exploring. They will be located The following will be presented in this time slot:

First Floor

  • The Digital Divide: Investigating Technologies That Help Bridge the Gap Between Virtual and Brick & Mortar Learning (Conrad Tucker)

  • Analysis of Factors Affecting Student Learning Outcomes in a MOOC by In-depth Exploration of the Penn State “Creativity, Innovation, and Change” (CIC) Course (Jack Matson)

Second Floor

  • Design and Implementation of a Mobile Eye-Tracking System to Assess Parent-Child Interactions in Informal Learning Environments (Koraly Perez-Edgar)

  • Uncovering the Geography of Learner Engagement in MOOCs (Anthony Robinson)

Speakers
avatar for Jack Matson

Jack Matson

Emeritus Professor, Matson & Associates, Inc.
Jack V. Matson, Ph.D., PE, the founder and principal owner of the firm, is a testifying expert specializing in chemical emissions, historical industry knowledge and regulations. He is Emeritus Professor of Environmental Engineering at Penn State. He started up Envinity, a green design and construction in 2005. In 2012, Bhutopia LLC was formed to provide innovative consulting services to Massive Open On-line courses (MOOCs) . He is the author... Read More →
avatar for Anthony Robinson

Anthony Robinson

Assistant Professor and Director of Online Geospatial Education, Department of Geography, The Pennsylvania State University
I direct Penn State's Online Geospatial Education programs and serve as an Assistant Director in the Department of Geography's GeoVISTA Center. On nights and weekends I'm Vice President of NACIS and Chair of the ICA Commission on Visual Analytics.
CT

Conrad Tucker

Assistant Professor of Engineering Design and Indu


Saturday March 21, 2015 9:45am - 11:30am
First/Second Floor Break Area

9:45am

Technology Demo/Service Areas Morning Session
Come see first-hand what's new and exciting in ed tech, including consultations!

First Floor

iEnsemble (Penn State School of Music)

Streaming Video Resources (University Libraries/Penn State Abington)

Doceri (Classroom and Lab Computing)

One Button Studio (Advanced Learning Projects)

TLT Emerging Technology Evaluation Initiative (Emerging Technologies)

Second Floor

Interactivity and Engagement in Online Courses (World Campus/Academic Unit Shops)

3D Printing

Accessibility Consultations (accessibility practitioners and policy experts)

High-Impact Teaching Projects (SITE)

Introduction to Training Services (ITS Training Services)

Saturday March 21, 2015 9:45am - 11:45am
First/Second Floor Break Area

10:00am

Adaptive Learning and Online Science Labs
Online learning has become a widely used way for students to access educational opportunities for over a decade now and has become widely accepted as a means of engaging students at a distance, in many different disciplines. The simultaneous development of adaptive learning technologies provides a way to enhance student learning in the classroom. This pedagogical approach has been widely reviewed as an effective method to increase student engagement and learning of course content.

With the development of distance learning, online education, and degree offerings at many institutions, including Penn State via the World Campus, many students and faculty see the value of participating in rigorous degree programs. In the biological sciences, one of the factors reducing the widespread offering of online degrees has been the notion that science laboratory experiences cannot be effectively done online. The convergence of adaptive learning technology and computer simulations has begun to challenge that assertion.

This session will demonstrate the use of commercially available lab simulations that incorporate adaptive learning technology to prepare students for participation in virtual lab activities. A history of the development of two courses in Introductory Microbiology will be presented. Included will be a discussion of the materials available with an explanation of how decisions were made in the selection of the best products available. A demo of the technology used in the course will be followed by a discussion of ways this technology can be used in other types of academic settings.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Troyan

Michael Troyan

Instructor, Penn State


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 107

10:00am

Badging the Road to Digitally Literate Teaching in Philosophy
The Digital Pedagogy Badging Program in Philosophy is designed to provide direction and clear milestones for graduate students and other instructors interested in developing the skills and habits associated with digital literacy. It is structured in accordance with the timeline for graduate coursework, teaching, and research and it is aimed to promote the timely development of skills that contribute to overall success in each of these areas. The program is flexible enough to accommodate people within a wide range of prior experience and interest in using digital technologies. It aims to be structured enough to provide clear guidance, support, feedback, and community recognition for individuals at each step.

The badges focus on three central areas of teaching with technology: Digital Content Delivery, Digital Communications, and Reflective Pedagogy. Each of these areas is represented through badges that recognize, first, basic competencies, and then, more advanced proficiencies with respect to various modes of activity that are included within them. There is room for individual choice concerning both specific emphases within the badging system and specific means for demonstrating the skills it recognizes.

In this presentation, we will discuss the structure of the program, outline our rationale for developing it in the specific ways we have, share some preliminary findings from our pilot run, and explore ideas for connecting this program to other literacy initiatives. Audience participants will be asked to take part in a brainstorming exercise concerning the opportunities and challenges for developing similar digital pedagogy initiatives in other departmental and college contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Fisher

Mark Fisher

Lecturer
avatar for Kate Miffitt

Kate Miffitt

Director, Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 109

10:00am

C.O.L.T.: A College Level Faculty Development Model to Improve Online Education
Most people familiar with online education recognize that it often happens in a vacuum. That can lead to isolation, which in turn is detrimental to learning and teaching. Many are aware of these consequences at the student level (e.g., lower course completion rates, lack of connection with the institution). Thankfully, many efforts have been put forth to address this issue for students.

However, fewer people are aware that the same thing can occur for faculty, albeit in a slightly different form (e.g., stymieing creativity, lack of connection to the institution, not seeking out development in teaching or technical skills, not seeking support for classroom issues). While most professional development is aimed at the instructor level, few development efforts are targeted to the administrators who oversee online teaching and who make critical decisions about staffing, training, and a myriad of decisions relative to their department’s online portfolios.

In the College of the Liberal Arts, the Dean’s Office recognized this and formed a group known as C.O.L.T. (Coordinators of Online Learning and Teaching) to address this issue and improve the quality of online learning and teaching. A partnership was formed between the Dean’s Office, World Campus Faculty Development, and an experienced online instructor to lead conversations regarding supporting online faculty as well as addressing practical issues.

This open discussion of the C.O.L.T. model will hopefully lead to replicable success for other colleges in building an online administrator professional community with knowledge and skills needed to improve online learning and teaching.

Speakers
AK

Avis Kunz

Assistant Dean, Filippelli Institute


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 208

10:00am

Canvas Pilot Panel Investigation
During the spring 2015 semester, Information Technology Services and the Office of Outreach and Online Education have been piloting Canvas, a learning management system (LMS) by Instructure, Inc. Launched in 2011, Canvas is currently used by over 800 learning institutions. Students, faculty, and staff throughout Penn State have been invited to participate in the pilot and will help guide future decisions and recommendations for the new enterprise LMS.

Speakers
JB

John Butler

Ed Tech Consultant, Penn State University
AF

Andy Fisher

Programmer, Penn State University
avatar for Terry O'Heron

Terry O'Heron

Director, TLT Operations, The Pennsylvania State University
Terence (Terry) N. O'Heron is the program manager for Penn State’s Course Management System (ANGEL). He's responsible for coordinating services provided by various administrative and academic units supporting the successful development and deployment of ANGEL functionality which facilitates teaching, learning, and research for 100,000+ faculty and students. This encompasses education technologies, faculty development, training, and user... Read More →
NR

Nida Rehman

Visiting Assistant Professor, Penn State University
KT

Kate Twoey

INSTRUCTIONAL PRODN SPC 3, Penn State University World Campus
IT Trainer
avatar for Brian Young

Brian Young

Instructional designer, Penn State University
IT Manager


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 207

10:00am

Data Learning Center: Developing Services That Help Students Transform Data into Information
Students are, sometimes unknowingly, confronted with a myriad of opportunities to use data to make sense of the world around them. They are also being bombarded with seemingly endless technological options that promise to help them make sense of data. This session is intended to start a conversation about strategies that the University Libraries are taking in developing services to help students succeed in transforming data into information.

We will begin by taking a brief look at the current trends in digitization, data publishing, and access. This will be followed by a discussion about the types of demands for data services that we are seeing from students and faculty. We will also talk briefly about existing services for data within the University and the potential for collaboration.

Within this framework, we will discuss initiatives that we are currently working on to help facilitate, develop, and promote our services. We will talk in-depth about what our current interaction with students looks like and how that is informing us in the creation of a data consultation library, training seminars, and other future initiatives.

Finally, we will discuss the unique makeup of our data services team, providing a meaningful discussion about the need for integrating technology with methodological experience and craftsmanship. Whether it is mapping tweets, visualizing text and images, or analyzing data from a survey, students are longing for services that will help them make that leap from access to interpretation and inspiration.

Speakers
SA

Stefanie Austin

Statistical Information Specialist
avatar for Tara  LaLonde

Tara LaLonde

GIS Specialist
NP

Nathan Piekielek

Geospatial Services Librarian, The Pennsylvania State University
SW

Stephen Woods

Social Science Librarian


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 206

10:00am

Delivering Rich Location-Based Experiences at Palmer Museum Using iBeacon
Location-aware technologies hold the promise of delivering context-relevant experiences to users who are exploring new spaces. Unfortunately, GPS, the most prominent driver of location-aware technologies, only functions outdoors. QR codes, another popular solution, are unintuitive and clunky. Recently, Apple released iBeacon, a new technology which enables "indoor GPS." iBeacon allows mobile devices to sense their proximity to small, inexpensive, and low-power transmitters. Penn State’s Teaching and Learning with Technology unit has developed a new mobile app to deliver proximity-specific content (text, image, and audio) to mobile devices. In partnership with the Palmer Museum of Art, we have created a unique, media-rich experience for patrons that is driven entirely by their location within the museum. Visitors using this app are automatically presented with narration, ambient sounds (period music, etc.), details about the works of art and related materials, and behind-the-scenes anecdotes to enrich their visit as they move about the space. This session will detail the trial process of creating interpretive materials using iBeacon technology for a special exhibition housed at the Palmer Museum of Art.

In this presentation, we will provide a hands-on demonstration of iBeacon to illustrate the types of content and user experience we provided in the Palmer Museum of Art, and to further expand on the possibilities of this technology.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Millet

Chris Millet

Asst. Director, ETS, Education Technology Services, TLT, ITS, Penn State University
Manager of Educational Technology, Penn State University


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 203

10:00am

Get Flipped with VoiceThread
This session shows faculty how VoiceThread is being used to flip traditional lecture-based science and math courses to convey essential core concepts as well as difficult-to-comprehend, complex concepts and processes. Participants will be engaged through considering their own curriculum in a think-pair-share activity, where they will explore using VoiceThread to flip classes from being traditional residential face-to-face courses to being offered in a blended format, and consider how the use of PowerPoint and video lectures delivered through VoiceThread might improve online courses. Participants will be challenged to carefully consider the most important concepts that students need for fundamental core knowledge for a course, as well as the most complex topics that are known to be complicated topics for students to grasp, and to consider the use of VoiceThread presentations for students. This session will share how students are able to view and review content as necessary for their individual instructional needs through the use of VoiceThread. They are able to take the time to phrase questions in a clear manner, and they are able to insert the question into the presentation where it makes the most impact on their individual learning process without interrupting the flow of the presentation. Additionally, participants will see how content presented through VoiceThread can more easily contain illustrations and videos that assist in conveying complex processes and concepts.

Speakers
NA

Neyda Abreu

Associate Professor


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 205

10:00am

GoAnimate: Engaging Students in Course Material with Animated Video
In a lower-level undergraduate course, a traditional research paper was used to immerse students into the theories of personality psychology. However, students often complained that traditional term papers were the least creative and engaging activity assigned in the course. Thus, we wanted to provide students with a more creative and engaging option. We thought GoAnimate, a multimedia software product, would provide students with a more creative and engaging activity. Students produced animated videos that featured two personality theorists who argued about the strengths and weaknesses of their respective theories. A survey was administered upon completion of the GoAnimate project to assess the effectiveness of the software on learning. Results are discussed in terms of the benefits as well as the challenges of using animation video software products.

Speakers
RH

Richard Harnish

Associate Professor, Penn State, New Kesington Campus


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 105

10:00am

Invigorate Students’ Interpersonal Communication and Presentation Skills with InterviewStream
Today’s students communicate, almost exclusively, through technology. Fast and furiously, they text, email, and use social media to express themselves. Happiness, sadness, anger, frustration, it is all shared with no interpersonal connection. As a result, students struggle with real-world, one-on-one, face-to-face interactions because they are not developing meaningful interpersonal communication skills. During the workshop, participants will learn to integrate technology and interpersonal communication strategy in a meaningful way.

InterviewStream is an interactive, online program purchased by Penn State as an enhancement tool for Career Services. It allows students to behave and answer questions in an online "mock interview" for assessment purposes. The beauty is that the manager of the interview designs the format, questions, time allowance, and assessment criteria for each answer. Because not all students take advantage of Career Services, and because today’s students are competing for internships earlier and earlier, Penn State Lehigh Valley is bringing InterviewStream into CAS 100A classes. Students do an early semester interview, study interview strategy, then complete a late semester interview. Results, to date, have been assessed and we see a dramatic difference in the pre- and post-interviews. Additionally, students have completed surveys that indicate a positive response to the activity.

The applications for this program are far from limited to just Career Services or CAS 100A. It can help enhance overall presentation skills, marketing proposals, debate platforms, etc.

Our goal is to acquaint attendees with InterviewStream, demonstrate its applications, and give tips for its use in classes.

Speakers
avatar for Eileen Grodziak

Eileen Grodziak

Instructional Design Specialist, Penn State Lehigh Valley


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 218

10:00am

Keynote Q&A
If you did not get an opportunity to ask Dr. Eric Mazur a question during the Q&A portion of his morning keynote, this session will give you an opportunity for discussion with him based on his keynote presentation.

Speakers
EM

Eric Mazur

Keynote Speaker


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 108

10:00am

Never Say Never: Bringing an Autopsy Experience to Life
The problem presented was to offer our World Campus nursing students the same opportunities as their resident instruction counterparts in the new Nursing Forensic Certificate. We had exhausted our search for an adequate off-the-shelf autopsy solution to offer our online students and it seemed that we were embarking on new territory. Therefore, we created our own experience to capture the learning objectives. The faculty was well versed in the forensic process of an autopsy, but as the discussion moved forward, it became clear we needed a few more experts and they needed to see through students’ eyes. We needed to capture the entire experience and as a result, the team attended autopsies and then set out to create our own multimedia experience.

Our story tells the journey of the faculty’s vision coming to fruition with a truly collaborative effort of a forensic nurse, a forensic pathologist, the College of Nursing, Continuing Education and Outreach, Mount Nittany Medical Center, Hershey Medical Center, World Campus, and WPSU to successfully placing all the pieces of the puzzle in alignment. The outcome means students enter an engaging case study to learn firsthand how to follow forensic protocol as part of a team.

We will present the initial vision and discuss all the logistics put into play to pull off a well-planned experience for our students. Learning strategies, challenges, best practices, and student evaluation will be presented, as well as the many impactful educational elements that were created, which the audience will have the chance to interact with.

Speakers
MM

Mindy McMahon

Director, Creative Services
CM

cecelia merkel

Project Manager
AS

Alicia Swaggerty

Instructional Designer


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 202

10:00am

One Tool Doesn't Fit All
In this presentation, we will share practical applications for tools and technologies using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to engage, provide access, and motivate all learners. Our presentation will explore different tools and technologies you can use to apply the principles of UDL to learning.

We will begin by addressing the need and context for applying UDL. We will then dive into the brain research behind UDL, specifically examining the three learning networks that help explain the why, the what, and the how of learning. Utilizing this brain research, we will spend the majority of our time translating and applying the three learning networks to a variety of learning tools and technologies that you can start using today.

We will explore how to use web conferencing, collaboration tools, presentation tools, discussion forum tools, interactives, mini-quizzes, and other educational technology tools to stimulate interest and motivate learners; to present information and content in different ways; and to differentiate the ways that students can express what they know.

Join in on the fun as we tell stories, listen to music, and play games to better understand that one tool doesn’t fit all.

Speakers
avatar for Nikki Massaro Kauffman

Nikki Massaro Kauffman

Multimedia Specialist 4, Penn State World Campus
Uses video, graphics, code, analytics, finely crafted words, bubble gum, duct tape, wit, and telekinesis to move ideas from experts' brains to larger audiences.
RK

Ryan Klinger

Instructional Designer
avatar for Sonya Woods

Sonya Woods

Accessibility Consultant, World Campus Learning Design
I do accessibility consulting, training, research, evaluation, and documentation in the context on online higher ed and am an advocate for universal design for learning.


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 204

10:00am

Overcoming Common Misconceptions about Hybrid Course Design
Over the past few years, hybrid learning models have gained popularity at all levels of education. As faculty interest in transitioning courses to a hybrid delivery model increases, faculty development and instructional design are becoming more important. Quality hybrid course design requires an understanding of true hybrid learning and proper support before the course even begins. This presentation will offer proven best practices and suggestions for both instructors and instructional designers looking to develop engaging hybrid courses.

Common misconceptions based on real hybrid course design experiences will be discussed throughout the presentation. For instance, the time needed for preparation prior to the class offering can be greater for hybrid courses. An effective hybrid course also requires a look at the course from a macro perspective long before the course begins.

Attendees will come away with a better understanding of hybrid learning principles and a heightened awareness of potential misconceptions relating to the design process. By walking through the various design transitions, attendees will get a glimpse of the hybrid course design process and mindset.

Speakers
JH

John Haubrick

Instructional Designer
JS

Joseph Scott

Instructional Designer


Saturday March 21, 2015 10:00am - 10:45am
Room 106

10:45am

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 21, 2015 10:45am - 11:00am
TBA

11:00am

CIC Story 2: Opening to China
Before we start with the presentation, we will have participants complete the first creativity exercise that students were asked to complete in our course, which we call the Shoe Tower exercise. Next, we will introduce CIC 2.0 course design innovations, which included translation of all course materials into Chinese; streamlining it along four key ideas, namely Creative Diversity, CENTER, Innovation, and Value Creation; introducing the peer review process; using 34 community TAs who had taken CIC 1.0; and shortening the course to six weeks and simplifying it. Then, we will turn to how students experienced the course and we will utilize findings from a post-course survey where students shared their input on what they liked the best and the least about the course. About 325 students provided textual feedback on the course in the post-course survey, and their entries will be analyzed qualitatively to find out the strengths and weaknesses of this unique course from the students’ perspective.

Speakers
avatar for Jack Matson

Jack Matson

Emeritus Professor, Matson & Associates, Inc.
Jack V. Matson, Ph.D., PE, the founder and principal owner of the firm, is a testifying expert specializing in chemical emissions, historical industry knowledge and regulations. He is Emeritus Professor of Environmental Engineering at Penn State. He started up Envinity, a green design and construction in 2005. In 2012, Bhutopia LLC was formed to provide innovative consulting services to Massive Open On-line courses (MOOCs) . He is the author... Read More →
AT

ARMEND TAHIRSYLAJ

Graduate Assistant


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 202

11:00am

Digital Learning @ Penn State: A Conversation with University Leaders
Through a long history of innovation, Penn State has employed educational technologies to improve instruction for students on campus and at a distance. However, the emergence and expanded use of web-enhanced courses, coupled with increasing numbers of resident students taking online courses, have vaulted the University to move to a much more blended form of instruction, allowing students access and learning through a wide variety of pedagogies and forms of instruction. The resulting blurring of the boundaries between face-to-face and online instruction is challenging many of our traditional budget, administrative, and instructional models.

What major initiatives are under way to respond to these changes? What opportunities are at the forefront? What are the most significant challenges we are facing? At this interactive panel discussion, we will explore these questions—and those from the audience—as four Penn State leaders offer their perspectives.

Attend this session to hear from Richard Coons, senior director for Information Technology, Commonwealth Campuses; Jennifer Sparrow, senior director of Teaching and Learning with Technology; Robert Pangborn, vice president and dean for Undergraduate Education; and Craig Weidemann, vice president for Outreach, vice provost for Online Education. 

We will kick things off with brief updates from our panelists, followed by an opportunity to engage in conversation through questions solicited from the audience. Bring your enthusiasm and questions to what is sure to be an informative and lively session!

Moderators
SC

Sandy Clemmer

Director, Online Professional Education

Speakers
RP

Robert Pangborn

Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Educatio
JS

Jennifer Sparrow

Senior Director
CW

Craig Weidemann

Vice President for Outreach Vice Provost for Onlin, The Pennsylvania State University


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 207

11:00am

Dynamically Building Books Using Open Educational Resources
We now live in an era of ubiquitous learning where information is rapidly increasing and dynamic. To facilitate learning in such an environment, customized and personalized educational options and learning resources, such as MOOCs, online badging systems, Wikibook, Wikiversity, and others, have been proposed. While they provide choice and flexibility, creating and maintaining high-quality and up-to-date learning resources at large scale is a challenging problem, especially for some domains such as computer science where knowledge quickly changes. For example, the latest version of the popular book "Machine Learning and Pattern Recognition" from 2009 misses much of the recent development of machine learning techniques such as deep learning and transfer learning. However, most of this content is publicly available online in high-quality and readable formats provided by expert researchers and scholars. Thus, a solution we are prototyping intelligently harvests online resources and reorganizes them in a format of a personalized learning resource similar to a textbook.

By building an interactive online book generation tool, we can significantly reduce the cost of creating and maintaining learning resources, give more personalized customization, offer a larger selection of learning resources, and enable more efficient online collaborative learning.

Speakers
LG

Lee Giles

Professor
BP

Bart Pursel

Faculty Programs Coordinator


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 109

11:00am

Making a Tri-Campus Degree Program Work for Students
During this session, best practices regarding how to work collaboratively to offer online and blended courses as well as working with students at multiple campuses will be discussed. We will focus on three areas that ensure students receive the same experience no matter where they are located: faculty communication and collaboration, course design considerations, and successes and lessons learned. Scenarios will be used to describe technical, staffing, and student engagement issues that have come up with this shared program. The audience will be asked to participate and brainstorm some solutions. The faculty and instructional designer will then share how the issue was resolved and discuss the outcome after using a specific strategy to solve the problem.

Speakers
SB

Steven Brewer

Assistant Professor
avatar for Julie Lang

Julie Lang

Instructional Designer, TLT
MP

Mari Pierce

Assisant Professor


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 107

11:00am

Math Meets Pop Culture
Assignments aligned with pop culture—specifically, popular television shows and Internet videos—are interesting to students and provide simple ways to engage them in the learning process. This session will discuss creative and analytical strategies in ensuring that these assignments are meaningful and professional, in addition to being fun and memorable.

Join us for a mathematics class assignment that paired a "Shark Tank"-like TV concept with an element of the Internet’s "TED Talks." Initial assignments brought mediocre results until the math instructor collaborated with a speech instructor. Two plus two plus storytelling speech effects equaled meaningful and memorable videos. Strategies covering both pertinent content and successful storytelling and delivery were stressed.

Along with having to thoroughly understand the mathematics involved, the students gained the confidence to talk to both a live audience and a virtual audience (the camera!). The videos were then used for future semesters as examples of the good and the bad.

Videos of a couple of the projects along with lessons learned, by both the students and the instructors, will be shown during the session. Also, other project ideas will be shared with a challenge of incorporating these projects into any field of study.

Speakers
AF

Angela Fishman

Instructor
RM

Rosemary Martinelli

Marketing Communications Consultant/PSU Faculty


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 204

11:00am

Penn State Digital Badges: From Concept to Implementation
Faculty and staff involved in Penn State's new digital badging system will give an overview of the pedagogical and technological foundations that gave rise to badges at Penn State. They will walk through the new digital badging platform, Badges at Penn State, and then they will look at a cocurricular badging program recently implemented across Penn State.

Speakers
AC

Ann Clements

Associate Professor
avatar for Casey Fenton

Casey Fenton

Multimedia Specialist, Penn State
avatar for Kate Miffitt

Kate Miffitt

Director, Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship
avatar for Chris Stubbs

Chris Stubbs

Manager, Emerging Technology and Media
Educational Gaming, Social Media and Education, Instructional Technology, Student Engagement, hot wings & cake


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 208

11:00am

Study Smart: Generation of Study Plans for Individual Students
Students want to learn better and instructors want to see better performance, but often it is unclear what specific topics students need to focus on. Study Smart is a system that analytically matches fine-grained learning goals with multiple course activities, and then recommends a study plan to students, based on their performance on different learning goals. In addition, the tool should also help instructors and designers improve the course by providing analytic information about students’ mastery of specific learning goals.

In this session, Bill Goffe, the instructor of ECON 104, and Tsan-Kuang Lee, the architect of Study Smart, will share their experience in developing Study Smart and applying it in this challenging GenEd course that introduces students to macroeconomics. Thousands of Penn State students take this course every year. The scale of the course (section sizes are 300-plus) makes it challenging to provide help with students’ individual needs. Study Smart is designed to address this problem.

The presenters will talk about how they structured the learning goals for the course and how they tied the learning goals (approximately fifty) to course activities: clicker questions, quizzes, homework assignments, pre-lecture readings, and exams. There are about 300 observations per student across these activities. Also detailed is how they collected and loaded the data into the system, students’ reactions to the system, and what they learned from this pilot. Finally, they will describe how you can use similar methods to improve your course.

Speakers

Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 108

11:00am

The Online Team Collaboration Framework
One of the goals of education is to prepare students with the professional skills to gain employment. To be prepared for employment, skilled teamwork is necessary. Teamwork is also a way to facilitate student-student interactions. Those interactions can be essential to the success of an online learning environment. Through peer interaction and collaboration, students are able to synthesize and evaluate their ideas collectively and are forced to reflect upon and reason about their ideas at greater depth than when working individually.

The focus of this session will be to describe the investigation designed to improve individual learning while effectively collaborating on an online course team project. We collected both qualitative data through the constant comparative method to understand the student experience and inform our development of a framework of team guidance, and quantitative data through pre- and post-testing, to assess team cognition changes and learning. The resulting framework, an innovative three-stage collaboration model for online, asynchronous, and geographically-distributed teaming, will be described.

The session will begin with relevant background and context of this project where particular focus will be on describing the course, experiment, and qualitative and quantitative data. A discussion will follow, encouraging the audience to comment on their experience implementing team projects in an online course.

Speakers
JD

Joanna DeFranco

Assistant Professor of Software Engineering


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 105

11:00am

TLT Faculty Engagement Awards: Go Paperless, Save Time, Be Happy!
It is not uncommon for courses within many disciplines to require significant use of printed materials, especially those with writing requirements or freehand diagrams and illustrations. Paper is used as a convenient medium for sharing assignments, either for instructor or peer review. Several technologies exist that cannot only reduce the need for paper and minimize environmental and financial costs, but also reduce turnaround time for feedback, encourage better feedback, and potentially improve learning.

Freshman biology lab reports: Every instructor who teaches writing-intensive courses struggles with the challenges of grading multiple written assignments. See how the use of Turnitin reduced instructor time spent preparing and grading lab report drafts. Students and instructors alike preferred the use of the paperless process. Turnitin is known for checking originality; now learn how GradeMark saved reams of paper and simplified the process of providing comprehensive feedback on students’ writing. See the benefits and challenges of using Turnitin.

Electrical engineering: This project focuses on improving the submission, grading, and feedback processes of lab reports and in-lab paper-based quizzes and assignments in electrical engineering technology and computer engineering technology courses. In-lab assignments pose challenges in that they contain drawings and circuits and are currently posted as Word documents to ANGEL.

In this session, we will share the goals of this round of Faculty Engagement Awards, and then two faculty and two instructional designers will present their paperless solutions. We will provide the audience with generalizable takeaways that they can use in their classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for Eileen Grodziak

Eileen Grodziak

Instructional Design Specialist, Penn State Lehigh Valley
avatar for Mary Ann Mengel

Mary Ann Mengel

Instructional Multimedia Designer, Penn State Berks
avatar for Chris Millet

Chris Millet

Asst. Director, ETS, Education Technology Services, TLT, ITS, Penn State University
Manager of Educational Technology, Penn State University


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 206

11:00am

Using Classroom iPads for Self-Led and Collaborative Learning
This session discusses strategies using iPads to bring the opportunity for self-led learning often found in online courses into a collaborative learning format for face-to-face and hybrid classrooms. Doing so allows instructors to combine the affordances of exploratory learning and close knowledge of individual student learning styles found in online environments with the benefits of in-person scaffolding and synchronous feedback afforded by hybrid and face-to-face formats.

The session will begin with an open discussion of the benefits of self-led and collaborative learning, barriers to introducing them in the face-to-face classroom, and discussion of the role of explicit instruction when such activities are being used. Following, I will share examples of how I have used iPads in the classroom to engage students in a variety of activities, including research, the creation of documents such as media releases and advertisements, the creation and delivery of presentations, and more. Finally, I will share student feedback on using iPads in the classroom, and how such activities can be adapted to different formats to create consistency across varying modes of delivery for the same class.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Chewning

Lisa Chewning

Assistant Professor


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 218

11:00am

Using Social Media to Globalize Curriculum
Can social media use in a classroom setting lead to significant global learning?

First, workshop facilitators will describe global learning and how social media can play a role in global competency development. Next, they will share experiences from the field, highlighting several social media integration failures as well as success stories.

Finally, workshop facilitators will describe a model of course design for significant global learning based on Fink’s (2009) six dimensions of course design. Session participants will have the opportunity to utilize the model to create learning objectives for a social media assignment for global learning.

This workshop is designed for educators who are new to globalizing curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Foster

Daniel Foster

Teacher Educator
I am a passionate individual looking to make a positive difference in the world around me. 7th Generation Texan; Taught Ag for 4 years in Willcox, Arizona; Be a Legend, it is all about the Legends; Truly Believe that You can Change the World as we know it; I am seeking my challenge and passion to become a Legend with Life is a Marathon...Not a Sprint.
MF

Melanie Foster

Assistant Professor


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 106

11:00am

Utilizing WordPress Penn State Sites for Delivery of Shared Online Learning
WordPress is a broadly used blogging and online content management tool. Penn State provides faculty, staff, and students access to WordPress through Sites at Penn State. While there are a myriad of creative uses for this platform, using it as a course platform is an obvious choice. Two of the benefits to this tool are the flexibility and ease of use. In this presentation, two faculty members and one web strategist/designer will describe two courses that are currently using Sites at Penn State as a central content delivery tool. In this presentation, the faculty who developed the courses will provide an overview of their courses as they appear online and provide perspective on what they feel were some of the most important lessons they have learned from their course development. The faculty will provide insight into the current data they collected on course outcomes. Both courses were offered to students, so the students’ perspective may be particularly valuable to those interested in developing future courses. Finally, a web designer will provide perspective on what faculty have done right, as well as some places to be more effective. Those attending this presentation should expect to leave with a clearer understanding of how Sites at Penn State can be used to effectively develop and implement a blended or online course. In addition, the outcomes and reflections from faculty and the perspective from a web designer should allow for more effective and efficient use of time for those wishing to develop online courses.

Speakers
CM

Chrystine Mitchell

Assistant professor, Pennsylvania State University Berks Campus
avatar for Burt Staniar

Burt Staniar

Associate Professor, Department of Animal Science


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
Room 205

11:30am

COIL Links e-Poster Sessions 2
The e-poster presentations in the COIL Links area will feature COIL-funded researchers describing the progress they are making and the questions they’re exploring. The following will be presented in this time slot:

First Floor

  • Teaching Science Labs Online: Development and Validation of an Instructional Model Enabled by Google Glass (Heng Luo)

  • Using Online Learning Technology to Improve Social Skills for Individuals with Autism (Suzanne Scherf)

Second Floor

  • Using Artificial Intelligence to Accelerate Student Mastery of Effective Interpersonal Communication and Conflict Resolution Strategies (Jennifer Frank)

  • Designing "Soft Skills" Training for an Online Global Community (Laurie Mulvey)


Speakers
JF

Jennifer Frank

assistant professor
HL

Heng Luo

Research Associate
LM

Laurie Mulvey

Executive director


Saturday March 21, 2015 11:30am - 1:45pm
First/Second Floor Break Area

11:45am

Lunch
Saturday March 21, 2015 11:45am - 1:15pm
President's Hall

12:45pm

Open Innovation Challenge
The Open Innovation Challenge offers a high-profile speaking opportunity to present new innovative ideas about anything that enhances teaching and learning in higher education. Select innovators will be given an opportunity to showcase their ideas in a set of fast-paced 5 minute presentations. The audience will have the opportunity to vote on their favorite ideas.

Visit https://challenge.tlt.psu.edu/ to view the Open Innovation Challenge presenters and the ideas they will be discussing.

Speakers
AC

Ann Clements

Associate Professor
KK

Katie Kostohryz

Assistant Professor
avatar for Rungun Nathan

Rungun Nathan

Associate Professor & Program Coordinator Mechanic, Penn state Berks
Teaching with technology. Have used a ink-based tabletpc fora long time (since 2001). Looking into bringing engineering experiments into classroom with new hardware - this way students get in class experiments for engineering and hopefully that will enhance their engineering experience. | | Imagine brain storming put on high with technology - I would love for this idea to be exploited in classes I teach.
SR

Sam Richards

Director of Development, World in Conversation


Saturday March 21, 2015 12:45pm - 1:30pm
President's Hall

1:30pm

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 21, 2015 1:30pm - 1:45pm
TBA

1:45pm

At Sea with Zotero
A librarian and earth sciences professor teamed up to help students find useful, current news sources that they could then map to the national Ocean Literacy Principles, a document written for learners of all ages to understand essential principles and fundamental concepts about our global ocean. A secondary goal of the collaboration was to improve students’ fluency with news resources and ability to generate an annotated bibliography. The earth sciences faculty member required all students to use Zotero, a free online citation management tool created by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Students were required to share their Zotero libraries with their professor so she could monitor their progress throughout the semester. What students did not realize initially was that their individual Zotero libraries would serve as the source of their final examination. In order to get students up and running with Zotero, they attended two hands-on computer laboratory sessions led by librarians. The sessions also focused on teaching students to evaluate news sources according to a set of agreed-upon criteria defined by the CRAP test. This presentation will detail the collaboration between the science and library faculty, the successes and challenges students faced with the technology, how the Zotero sources served as the foundation for a cumulative take-home final exam, feedback from the students, and modifications made for a different earth sciences course the following semester. The speakers will exchange ideas with audience members in how to adopt this assignment to other disciplines/projects.

Speakers
avatar for Nina Clements

Nina Clements

Reference Librarian, Penn State University, Brandywine Campus
I work with professors to more thoroughly integrate research skills and services into the curriculum. Also: reader, editor, wordsmith, and cat wrangler.
avatar for Laura Guertin

Laura Guertin

Associate Professor of Earth Science, Penn State Brandywine
Passionate educator that cares deeply about increasing the scientific and geographic literacy of students pursuing non-science degrees. Mentors undergraduate student researchers and emphasizes the connections between disciplines. | | Loves the outdoors and visiting natural National Parks. Fan of geocaching/Earthcaching, natural history museums and aquariums. Always looking for ways to connect with my inner marine geologist.


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 218

1:45pm

ConnectED: A Penn State York Library First-Year Experience
Inspired by 2012 TLT Symposium keynote speaker Jane McGonigal, Penn State York campus head librarian Barbara Eshbach created a game-based program called ConnectEd: A Penn State York Library First-Year Experience (FYE) with the goals of fostering a sense of belonging on the campus, increasing student social engagement, and supporting first-year student success.

ConnectED programming aims to provide opportunities for social engagement and integration in which students make meaningful connections with peers, faculty, and staff through library programs. All events are open to the entire campus and aim to provide content of interest to college students. During these events, first-year students have an opportunity to make an explicit connection to other attendees. Students earn points in the game for both attendance and for making new connections. Points and attendance are tracked by students, using a colorful game board and stickers, and by the library, through the use of a database. The student with the most points at the end of the academic year earns an award to use towards tuition the following year.

Attendees to this presentation will get an overview of the project as well as ideas for creative formats for FYE programming including Flash Forums, Speak Easies, Marathon Reads, ConnecTED Talks, games, and special events, all aimed at increasing social engagement and supporting first-year student success. These programs could be used with or without the game component. Participants will also have an opportunity to experience various aspects of the game, including the connection portion.

Speakers

Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 206

1:45pm

Creating a Systemic Ecology around Digital Badges and Initiating a Design-Based Research Agenda
In the past year, we developed a set of ten digital badges that can be used for introducing the interdisciplinary, lifelong learning skills associated with information literacy. We will discuss what we have learned from test driving this initial set of badges. We will also share the useful products of the Teaching and Learning with Technology fellowship focused on complementing the badges with deliverables such as evaluation rubrics to score badge evidence, an infographic to help you design effective badges, and a website to engage and entice other educators and badge earners. The presentation will feature updates to Penn State’s badging platform as well. This will help participants focus on the whole system and show the many components that need to be thought out when badges are implemented and adopted by potential users.

The second part of our session will introduce the idea of design-based research (DBR) and how this concept can help you form a research team, like our fellows team, that leverages distributed expertise and strong collaboration as first steps in implementing DBR.

In this session, we will be sharing our deliverables and soliciting and encouraging feedback from the audience about these items in order to improve them. We also plan to encourage a discussion around the concept of DBR and hear the ideas of the audience about this concept and how they might implement it themselves. The participants will be active in the process through evaluating our work and seeing how these components can help or hinder the adoption of their own potential digital badges.

Speakers
VR

Victoria Raish

Graduate Assistant
avatar for Emily Rimland

Emily Rimland

Sally W. Kalin Librarian for Learning Innovations
avatar for Chris Stubbs

Chris Stubbs

Manager, Emerging Technology and Media
Educational Gaming, Social Media and Education, Instructional Technology, Student Engagement, hot wings & cake


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 109

1:45pm

Creating, Integrating, and Leveraging Accessibly-Compliant Video Assets in the Classroom
In the creation or modification of technologically savvy, robust, and enriching online courses, faculty must leverage a variety of supplemental content. As higher ed transitions from SD video assets that were once delivered on VHS, DVD, and over cable to the digital desktop in an HD world and beyond, faculty are challenged to either create or integrate accessibly-compliant video. Whether for student feedback, a lecture, or a supplemental video pertaining to the week’s lesson, leveraging and integrating compliant video assets is an ambitious task that presents specific technical challenges.

Video assets include live events, prerecorded lectures, library media, or supportive supplements that are captured, managed, and shared onsite by media platforms such as MediaCore or MediaSite, or hosted offsite at video-sharing websites like YouTube, Vimeo, or Google+. Regardless of where they are hosted, videos should be easily accessible by faculty and viewable to the end user—across operating systems, workstations, and mobile platforms—anywhere in the world.

If the goal of integrating compliant video into a learning management system (LMS) where online courses reside (such as ANGEL and Canvas) is met, positive and sustainable impact is guaranteed. In the transitional sense, form is replacing function as these LMS interfaces grow more media-friendly and robust. However, updates are expensive, too little, too late, or too innovative. Supplemental training on best practices and standards in this new environment can be met with failed efforts as technology moves forward and late adapters resist the challenge of change. Compliance can become ignored or overlooked.

This presentation will briefly discuss physical and financial costs associated with ADA compliance, potential work-arounds for still unmodified digital formats (peer mentoring) and the Universal Design concept.

Speakers
NH

Nicole Hill

Instructor of Mathematics, PENN STATE UNIVERSITY, USA
avatar for Anthony J. Hoos

Anthony J. Hoos

Content Manager and Adjunct, Penn State University
I currently manage all facets of content and to-air programming traffic for an Emmy-award winning multi-channel cable television facility in the Baltimore-Washington corridor, as well as globally across YouTube and Google+. I also adjunct in my areas of expertise: Media Production, COMM, Graphic Design (Fayette) and Information Systems (BSBIC-WD) .
MR

Michael Ridenour

Instructor of Accounting


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 204

1:45pm

Cross-University Teaching and Learning through the Creation of a Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC)
This presentation will be a group presentation in which each group member will provide details about the portion(s) of the project they were involved in creating or implementing.

The goal of this project was to partner with music education faculty from across all thirteen Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) universities that offer undergraduate music education degrees. The project created a series of learning modules that leveraged specific expertise found at each participating institution. Faculty expertise was highlighted through the creation of over forty artistically based video "talks" from thirty-plus faculty that focused on foundational topics of importance to American music teacher preparation. The learning modules were built collaboratively and act as a portion of introductory music education courses at each of the thirteen participating institutions. The format of these modules allows students and faculty from participating universities to experience the curricular content simultaneously and to communicate about their learning, with the intention of enriching experiences and providing innovative approaches through cross-university online learning.

Research surrounding this project sought to explore: 1) the degree to which students and faculty interact across institutional boundaries within a cross-university experience; 2) the educational experience of participants within a DOCC model; and 3) the potential advantages and disadvantages of a collaborative yet limited or "walled" experience as compared to a more open approach such as a MOOC.

This project was made possible through the support of the Penn State Center for Online Innovation in Learning (COIL) and the College of Arts and Architecture eLearning Institute.

Speakers
avatar for Gary Chinn

Gary Chinn

Director, penn state
AC

Ann Clements

Associate Professor
avatar for Angela Dick

Angela Dick

Instructional Designer
BP

Bart Pursel

Faculty Programs Coordinator


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 108

1:45pm

Democratization of Graphic Design in Education: Infographics and Web 2.0 Sites
The means of production for creating engaging and memorable infographics has become democratized with the development of infographic-specific composition websites like Easil.ly and Piktochart. These web 2.0 sites enable learners and instructors, who may be novices at graphic design, to produce compelling infographics without sophisticated software training or education in design principles.

As a result, a non-graphic design student can transfer his or her specialized knowledge or research into an infographic that can accompany more detailed artifacts, like research essays. As writing becomes more visually constructed, it benefits students to develop basic visual design skills in an academic context.

My examples will come from business writing, but the utility of an infographic in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities will also be detailed. The content of the presentation will be particularly useful for instructors with students who want to present at conferences because a simply-designed infographic can provide attendees with an easy-to-recall takeaway amid the information overload. Likewise, as students move on to job searches that involve technical presentations, a demonstrated understanding of how to visually simplify complex data can matter.

The presentation objectives are 1) to illustrate how infographics can complement a wide variety of student artifacts, 2) to demonstrate potential infographic maker websites, and 3) to ask attendees to reflect on what information in their field would benefit from a visual form—in a small group setting, then in a larger group.

The presentation will include time for attendees to either research infographic examples or to try one of the infographic websites.

Speakers

Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 107

1:45pm

Finding Their Way: Student Perceptions in Navigating Online Course Interfaces
From the outside, Penn State Online might seem like a single entity offering access to high-quality e-learning curricula to anyone across the globe. However, on closer inspection, online courses across the Penn State system are a diverse, dynamic collection of offerings with different designs and structures. Online course interfaces can look very different from college to college, and department to department. How do our online students perceive these divergent course interfaces? Does this diversity of design impact student learning? In this session, we will discuss findings from a survey of nearly 400 online students regarding course structure and the challenges of diverse user interfaces. Developed in collaboration with four colleges and the World Campus, and administered by the World Campus, this survey is the first of its kind to ask students the direct question: What, if any, challenges does the disparate nature of user interfaces present to students? We will provide an overview of the results, as well as detailed breakdowns by student age, campus, degree program, and experience with online learning. Finally, we will share our recommendations for addressing the most pressing student concerns.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Holsing

Cathy Holsing

Director, Learning Design, Penn State University
avatar for Lynne Johnson

Lynne Johnson

Manager of Instructional Design
avatar for Jane Keary-Thomas

Jane Keary-Thomas

Analysis and Planning Consultant, Outreach and Online Education, Penn State University
avatar for Wendy Mahan

Wendy Mahan

Senior Instructional Designer, Pennsylvania State University


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 208

1:45pm

Radical Transparency: Cultivating Community Engagement with General Education Reform
Rather than simply attempting to garner support and approval for a new General Education program at Penn State, we have sought to use the web to engage the University community in a broader discussion of the value of general education and to include them in the process by which decisions are made about the shape of the new curriculum. The GenEd.psu.edu website has become a living site of ongoing conversation and deliberation about the emerging new general education program at Penn State. In order to engage the community, the task force responsible for reforming the general education entered into a substantive collaboration with the Teaching and Learning with Technology Studio to create a dynamic web space designed to put the values of general education into practice. The result has been a highly visited and visible web community that has directly participated in the decisions that will shape the new curriculum.

This session will introduce the vision of transparent administrative engagement that has animated the creation of the GenEd website, discuss the technical challenges we have faced, present the data analytics that document our success, and demonstrate the innovative deliberative model we are using to empower the entire University community to inform decisions about the new general education curriculum.

We will use a live Twitter back channel to facilitate discussion with the audience and a wider community online. Further, we will invite the audience to participate in some of the practices of online deliberation we have used during the general education reform process.

Speakers
BH

Bevin Hernandez

Software Development Manager
BK

Brad Kozlek

IT Manager
avatar for Christopher Long

Christopher Long

Associate Dean, Penn State
I am an Associate Dean for Graduate and Undergraduate Education and Professor of Philosophy and Classics.
KS

Keith Shapiro

Associate Professor


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 207

1:45pm

Slack: Improve Group Work, Collaboration, and Communication in Your Class
Research shows that better communication among team or group members is key to any group project completion. The challenge for educators is often to ensure that all students contribute, track students' contribution in groups, and reduce the time spent in solving conflicts in the team. Assigning roles to students and providing some sort of structure is regularly the approach to facilitate collaboration within groups. This session will introduce a free web-based tool that would allow teachers to turn group work and collaboration into an enjoyable experience and improve communication among group members, while preparing students for the real world.

The session will begin with a discussion, where attendees will be asked, based on their experiences, to mention problems in team/group work. Drawing from the list provided by attendees, ideas from the audience will be gathered as to what technology they have used to address group or collaboration issues identified. Participants will then be asked to share their experiences with these technologies, the effect on the students’ overall learning experience during group work, and what they wish the technologies would have allowed them to do.

At the end of this discussion, the audience will be introduced to Slack to help them facilitate group communication and collaboration in their classes. Attendees will create groups using Slack, and use some integrated features that this application provides. They will be shown different ways of using this tool to facilitate group work, and assess group dynamic.

Speakers
RB

Rebecca Bayeck

Learning, Design and Technology Program, Penn State University
PL

Pei-Wei Lee

Graduate Student


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 205

1:45pm

Using Artificial Intelligence to Support Preservice Teacher Training
During our presentation, we will engage users in an AI simulation that illustrates how a teacher might interact with our new instructional technology. We will demonstrate various user experiences from the student perspective, the instructor perspective, and the developer perspective. Participants can follow along on their own laptop or mobile device to engage in the AI simulation.

Speakers
JF

Jennifer Frank

assistant professor
DS

Deborah Schussler

Associate Professor


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Room 106

1:45pm

COIL Links e-Poster Sessions 3
The e-poster presentations in the COIL Links area will feature COIL-funded researchers describing the progress they are making and the questions they’re exploring. The following will be presented in this time slot:

First Floor

  • Exploring Scholarly Discourse in MOOC Discussion Forums (Jim Jansen)

  • Understanding the Impact of Groups on Performance and Retention in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) (Adelina Hristova)

Second Floor

  • Tree Investigators: Using Augmented Reality and Mobile Computers Outdoors (Heather Toomey Zimmerman)

  • Developing an Interactive Cognitive Support System to Guide and Improve collective thinking processes for Online Collaborative Teams (Marcela Borge)



Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 3:45pm
First/Second Floor Break Area

1:45pm

Technology Demo Areas Afternoon Session
Come see first-hand what's new and exciting in ed tech!

First Floor

Introduction to Campus Collaborative Programs

TLT Faculty Engagement

Badges

One Button Studio (ALP)

Sites at Penn State

Second Floor

Interactivity and Engagement in Online Courses (World Campus/Academic Units)

3D Printing

Accessibility Consultations

Canvas Pilot (TLT Ops)

Multimedia Resources for MOOCs and Online Courses (WPSU)


Saturday March 21, 2015 1:45pm - 3:45pm
First/Second Floor Break Area

2:30pm

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 21, 2015 2:30pm - 2:45pm
TBA

2:45pm

"Social" Learning: Getting Students Engaged and "Sharing" with Yammer
This session is a copresentation on the use of Yammer.

The first presentation will focus on the use of Yammer in an introductory biology course offered in a traditional classroom setting. We will review the concept behind the project and technologies considered as vehicles for a photo project focused on biodiversity. The class experience with Yammer will be described. Successes and challenges of the assignment and technology will be detailed. Outcomes and student responses to the experience will be reviewed.

Next, we will take a look at the use of Yammer in online courses. We will address the question: Just how beneficial is the use of social media in an online learning environment? What do the students think?

We will share some survey results on students’ perceptions of the use of Yammer in their online courses, as well as engage in an open discussion on how to structure the use of Yammer in your course for the greatest impact on students’ engagement and overall learning experience.

Finally, we will have a joint discussion and address any questions. All levels of familiarity with Yammer are welcome!

Speakers
LH

Lauraine Hawkins

faculty member
Biologist, Penn State Mont Alto
avatar for Catherine Murphy

Catherine Murphy

Instructional Designer, Penn State University


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 105

2:45pm

Can a Classroom Design Change the Dimensions of Learning?
As a center that provides faculty professional development on a myriad of teaching topics and technologies, we were interested in learning how new active learning classroom designs were being used by the faculty whose courses had been assigned to them. Towards that end, faculty members were contacted and asked how the design of their classroom might be impacting their teaching and their students' learning. Additional questions asked included: Has the classroom design changed the dimensions of learning in your classes? Do you have questions about how to better use the opportunities the classroom design offers?

Answers to these questions were captured in order to create a short guide with an accompanying video on the use of active learning classrooms for faculty who are scheduled to teach in them.

The answers to these questions highlighted the challenges faculty were experiencing, the inadequacies of our room scheduling, the training needed on everything from the lighting controls to the technologies, the technical support needed for the technologies, and, the highlight—the amazing differences in the teaching and learning transactions in these classrooms! The video that will be unveiled captured some of these differences during class, and in short interviews with the faculty and students.

Now what? Let’s discuss which of these classroom designs should be replicated and why. How can they be funded? What preparations do faculty need in order change the dimensions of teaching and learning in these spaces? How do we translate these changes to the online environment?

Speakers
CM

Carol McQuiggan

Director & Sr. Instructional Designer
avatar for Martha J Strickland

Martha J Strickland

Associate Professor of Education, Penn State Harrisburg
I have extensive international experience. My research focuses on enhancing communication between teachers and immigrant families. I have leveraged child photography and iPod iMovies to accomplish this.
JW

Jane Wilburne

Associate Professor Mathematics Education


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 108

2:45pm

Go with the Flow: Understanding Flow Experience in Online Courses
"The best moments usually occur if a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile" (Cskszentmihalyi, 1990, p.3).

Flow experience is the "creative moment when a person is completely involved in an activity for its own sake" (Cskszentmihalyi, 2004, http://www.ted.com/talks/mihaly_csikszentmihalyi_on_flow/transcript?language=en#t-106152). This session will explore flow experience as it applies to learning design, discuss ways to create learning experiences that promote flow experience, and share student feedback regarding course aspects that affect flow experience, intrinsic motivation, and student enjoyment (note: enjoyment is expressed in terms of "happiness" in flow experience research).

Most online courses at the Smeal College of Business adopt simulation games, case-based learning, and project-based learning. It is always challenging to assess how motivated students are as well as how much they are actually enjoying their learning experience in the online environment because we can only rely on limited information provided by SRTEs and other course evaluations.

In fall 2014, we began collecting data from students to understand more about their virtual classroom experience including learning objectives, activities, time spent on course-related activities, level of challenges, subjective performance, and level of enjoyment. In this session, we will share our findings in both quantitative and qualitative ways. In addition to sharing our findings, we will integrate polls, games, and discussions to encourage participants to engage and share their experiences and questions. Come join us in the journey to online happiness!

Speakers
avatar for Renee Ford

Renee Ford

Instructional Designer, Penn State University-Smeal College of Business
My name is Renee Ford and I am a learning designer with a background in workplace learning & performance. I am passionate about design and innovation. I enjoy working collaboratively toward mission and goal accomplishment while encouraging systemic, organizational health. I believe that online learning, when designed well, is an opportunity to create quality, engaging curricula in a way that meets the needs of diverse learners. This is why... Read More →
avatar for I-Pang Fu

I-Pang Fu

Instructional Designer, Smeal College of Business, Penn State University


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 204

2:45pm

Interactive Lab Notebooks: Creating Interactivity in Online Science Courses
This session will address the use of an online lab notebook developed for GEOSC 30, a general education course on volcanology and the geosciences. Using Drupal, an open-source content management system, we worked with a company to develop a module to extend the functionality of Drupal.

This module allows the course instructor and learning designers to easily integrate different types of instructional content into a single, notebook-like learning environment, including texts, diagrams, tables, images, videos, downloadable resources, and diverse forms of assessment. The notebook can provide online students with a more interactive and individualized online learning experience by engaging them in activities such as uploading files or images, filling in tables or fields, submitting answers to questions, and downloading the notebook as a learning portfolio.

Finally, this session will discuss how the initial prototype has been implemented in the hybrid version of GEOSC 30 in the 2014 fall semester. Based on the initial evaluative feedback from both the instructor and students, we will identify the design problems and challenges from the prototype, and future plans to refine the interactive notebook to extend its functionality to include sketching or doodling, annotation, and other features. In addition, we will discuss plans to share the module with other users of Drupal, both at Penn State and beyond.

Speakers
MF

Maureen Feineman

Assistant Professor
EL

Erin Long

Learning Designer
avatar for Stevie Rocco

Stevie Rocco

Assistant Director, Dutton Institute, Penn State


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 107

2:45pm

Investigating Technologies That Help Bridge the Gap between Virtual and Brick and Mortar Learning
The objective of this session is to investigate the adoption of immersive, online learning technologies (e.g., Oculus Rift) in online learning platforms and their impact on students’ learning outcomes. Educators often lack predictive models that can inform them about the potential adoption of new online learning technologies prior to their implementation. These limitations are further exacerbated in the online education environment, where student feedback is primarily in the form of textual surveys (as opposed to visual feedback in a brick and mortar environment), thereby limiting educators’ ability to understand how these immersive, online learning technologies are being utilized (if at all). Researchers aim to investigate the following research question: Do augmented reality (e.g., Google Glass) and immersive systems (e.g., Oculus Rift) enhance student learning in the online space?

Immersive system: Immersive systems such as the Oculus Rift have the potential to enhance students’ online learning experience by providing them with a more connected visual representation of online content. This is particularly relevant in engineering courses, where 3-D design and augmentation are integral to course objectives (e.g., Solid Works).

Augmented reality system: Unlike immersive systems such as the Oculus Rift, augmented reality systems are not fully immersive and instead provide the user with additional visual information overlays onto their existing physical environment. During online learning activities, researchers will investigate whether the use of augmented reality systems (e.g., Google Glass) enhance student learning during online activities.

Speakers
avatar for Bryan Dickens

Bryan Dickens

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Penn State University
The Virtual Reality Education Experience.
CT

Conrad Tucker

Assistant Professor of Engineering Design and Indu


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 106

2:45pm

Rally—Open Academic Discussions in Shared Courses
During this session, participants will learn what Rally is and how it is being used to create a new common student experience in shared campus courses. This new student experience relies on technology to minimize time and location boundaries while fostering an on-campus experience that is broader and richer than what could be offered by a single campus. Results of a pilot featuring Rally in a hybrid Polycom business course will be discussed along with changes, based on student input, that will be implemented for a second pilot course. Participants will have the opportunity to experience Rally through hands-on activities and discussions.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Brautigam

Ben Brautigam

Manager, Advanced Learning Projects, Penn State University
Ben Brautigam is the Manager of Advanced Learning Projects within Teaching and Learning with Technology at Penn State University. His work concentrates on the research and development of emerging ed tech solutions with an intense focus on interface design and user experience. Areas of interest include mobile learning, media creation and distribution, and automated systems. Ben completed his undergraduate work at West Chester University and... Read More →
PM

Paul McDermott

BSB Coordinator/Business Instructor, Penn State University
Business Department Coordinator, Interim Corporate Communications Coordinator, Instructor in business. Technology in the classroom.
avatar for Jackie Ritzko

Jackie Ritzko

Instructional Designer


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 205

2:45pm

Universal Video Collaboration: It Has Arrived, and We’re Doing It
The session will cover the basics of utilizing video collaboration (via BlueJeans) to enhance learning environments in an academic setting. It will cover various use cases—including enabling synchronous learning—as informed by the deployment within World in Conversation in the College of the Liberal Arts. It will also demonstrate and emphasize the usability of BlueJeans through an integration into a custom registration web application built by World in Conversation. The usability and flexibility aspects of BlueJeans will be highlighted and demonstrated as they cannot be overstated. These things fundamentally separate the service from the myriad other services available and make it an ideal choice for enhancing education in the classroom.

The session will engage the audience by giving them access to the registration web application via smartphone during the presentation to illustrate the automated sign-up process for potential users to emphasize how easy and hassle-free it is. Some attendees will then be invited to join a live video session on their phone to demonstrate how quickly a session can be set up, and what it looks like in practice (accounting for reverb by asking those participants to use headphones or exit the room). The session will conclude with a discussion on the future of collaborative learning and why usability must be at the forefront of any technology system implemented for education.

Speakers
SR

Sam Richards

Director of Development, World in Conversation
TT

Tim Taylor

IT Consultant


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 206

2:45pm

What Do Our Learning Spaces Say about Us As a University?
We have an industrial model of education that treats students as widgets. We determine capacity of classrooms based on the minimum space per student possible, and not based on pedagogical purpose or quality. We bolt seats down facing forward, defining the possible kinds of teaching. We talk about what technology goes into the classrooms at Penn State, but we do not talk about the classroom as a technology itself. If we want to create a modern university, we need to reimagine what our students are doing in class, not just with computing technology, but also with the technology of the classroom. For the past year, our team has been considering questions about learning spaces at Penn State: a) how can classroom data be used to make better choices about design; b) how can we develop ways of describing classrooms to allow faculty and students to make better choices about where they take their classes; c) what data/information do we need to have a serious conversation about learning spaces on campus; d) how can we use all this to inform the design of the first classroom-specific building to be built on campus in almost 25 years? In this interactive session, we will engage the community in a conversation around the value of learning spaces, what the Penn State community wants from them, and what we want to know about the spaces around us so we can create a twenty-first century student-centered university.

Speakers
avatar for Scott McDonald

Scott McDonald

Associate Professor, Penn State
avatar for Chris Millet

Chris Millet

Asst. Director, ETS, Education Technology Services, TLT, ITS, Penn State University
Manager of Educational Technology, Penn State University
BP

Bart Pursel

Faculty Programs Coordinator
avatar for Mike Rook

Mike Rook

Postdoctoral Scholar, Krause Innovation Studio
Postdoctoral Scholar at the Krause Innovation Studio (201 Chambers Building)


Saturday March 21, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room 109

3:30pm

15 Minute Break
Saturday March 21, 2015 3:30pm - 3:45pm
TBA

3:45pm

3:55pm

Innovation Panel
The Innovation Panel will feature three leaders in the world of educational technology sharing their ideas and most innovative and exciting work in educational technology. They include:

  • Katie Vale, director of digital learning at Harvard, who has played a key part in some of the most influential educational technology projects of the past few decades;

  • Tom Cavanagh, associated vice president of distributed learning at the University of Central Florida, who is an award-winning instructional designer, program manager, faculty member, and administrator;

  • and Peter Doolittle, executive director for the Center for Instructional Development and Educational Research at Virginia Tech, who has 25 years experience teaching undergraduate and graduate students in using traditional, blended, and online formats.


Moderators
KB

Kyle Bowen

Director, Education Technology Services

Speakers
avatar for Peter Doolittle

Peter Doolittle

Assistant Provost for Teaching and Learning, Virginia Tech, Virginia Tech
Peter Doolittle is currently Assistant Provost for Teaching and Learning, Executive Director of the Center for Instructional Development and Educational Research (CIDER), and Professor of Educational Psychology at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia. CIDER is involved with a variety of institutional initiatives, including the Pathways for General Education, Destination Area Support and Strategic Growth Areas, Personalized Learning, Large Class... Read More →
KV

Katie Vale

Director


Saturday March 21, 2015 3:55pm - 4:45pm
President's Hall